Mass. Schools To Cut Costs With New Solar Projects

solar project

Mass. Schools To Cut Costs With New Solar Projects

by Joseph Bebon

Solect Energy and Green Street, members of SunPower’s national dealer network, have developed two SunPower solar systems totaling 6.9 MW that will provide electricity to 10 Massachusetts schools.

 

“We applaud Stonehill College for its proven commitment to sustainability,” says Scott Howe, partner and senior vice president of sales at Solect Energy. “With the addition of this SunPower solar canopy system, the college now has a grand total of six megawatts of solar installed on campus – and they are able to reinvest savings earned from the solar systems into areas of need such as student scholarships, maintenance, and campus upkeep.”

In Bridgewater, Green Street has developed a 4.1 MW SunPower Helix Roof system at Ajax United Drive LLC. Green Street will own the off-site solar power system – as well as the associated renewable energy credits – while Attleboro Public Schools will buy the power produced through a PPA, solar projectsaving an estimated $3 million over 20 years, according to SunPower. Energy from the system is expected to meet about 75% of electricity needs for five elementary schools, three middle schools and one high school.

 

“With SunPower’s innovative solar solutions, we were able to transform an unused, off-site rooftop into a mini power plant that benefits a number of partners including the building owner and local school district,” says Scott Kerner, CEO of Green Street. “It’s incredibly rewarding to know that this SunPower solar system will deliver long-term value to the students of Attleboro by generating meaningful savings that can be reinvested into local classrooms.”

 

According to SunPower, a total of about 90 workers contributed to both the Stonehill College and Attleboro Public Schools installations during peak construction. SunPower says its solar technology has helped a number of Massachusetts schools save on energy costs, including Cape Cod Community College, Clark University, Edgerly School, Harvard University, and University of Massachusetts Lowell.

 

source: http://solarindustrymag.com/mass-schools-cut-costs-new-solar-projects

“Solar allows Stonehill to set an example for our students, faculty, and staff by prioritizing sustainability and stewardship of the planet and its resources,” said Michael Shulansky, Associate Director of Communications and Media Relations at Stonehill College.

“Furthermore, our solar installations have helped transform us into a leader in energy efficiency, and provide increased visibility of the College to environmentally conscious students, parents, and communities,” he added.
Financed by SunPower, a global leader in solar innovation, the solar canopies allow Stonehill to experience predictability in energy costs throughout the 20-year lifespan of the system while also reducing the school’s reliance on carbon-based fuels.
“It is wonderful to be a part of Stonehill’s continuous journey in sustainability,” said Scott Howe partner and Senior Vice President of Sales at Solect Energy. “With the addition of this solar canopy, the College now has a grand total of six megawatts of solar installed on campus – and they are able to reinvest savings earned from the solar systems into areas of need such as student scholarships, maintenance, and campus upkeep.”

“According to the “Fair Use” clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

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How Solar Power Will Empower the World

How Solar Power Will Empower the World

How Solar Power Will Empower the World

Solar power is cheaper than ever and it will revolutionize the world.

 

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How Solar Power Will Empower the World

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Mercedes-Benz Taps Vivint Solar For U.S. Rollout Of Home Batteries

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Mercedes-Benz Taps Vivint Solar For U.S. Rollout Of Home Batteries

Posted by Joseph Bebon

Mercedes-Benz Energy and Vivint Solar have announced an exclusive strategic partnership to bring the Mercedes-Benz customizable home energy storage system to the U.S. residential solar market.

“As Mercedes-Benz electrifies its vehicle fleet, solar-plus-storage is essential to enable those vehicles to be powered by clean energy,” says Boris von Bormann, CEO of Mercedes-Benz Energy Americas LLC. “With batteries featuring the best in automotive engineering from Mercedes-Benz and high-quality solar energy systems from Vivint Solar, our solution allows customers to take the next step toward a sustainable energy future. The launch of our home battery system in Europe has been successful, and we are thrilled to be working with Vivint Solar to bring a reliable and compelling solar-plus-storage offering to American homes.”

For Vivint Solar, which says it has installed solar at more than 100,000 homes across the U.S., this is the first collaboration to integrate batteries with its offering. With energy storage to complement rooftop solar, Vivint Solar expects its customers to be able to have more control over the renewable energy they generate. In addition to providing a backup power source if the grid goes down, the new combined solution may help customers reduce energy costs. For instance, in areas with time-of-use electricity rates, customers can store excess solar energy produced by the system during the day in the batteries and then consume it during periods of peak energy usage in the evening and at night, when electricity rates are typically higher.

Each energy storage system will consist of modular 2.5 kWh batteries that can be combined to create a system as large as 20 kWh, and Vivint Solar will customize each system based on the customer’s individual energy consumption needs.

California is the first U.S. market where Vivint Solar will offer this solution directly to homeowners. Beginning in the second quarter, new customers in California will be able to buy the offering outright or finance the purchase, either through one of the institutions with which Vivint Solar has relationships or through customers’ preferred lenders.

“The choice to work with Mercedes-Benz Energy, a world-class innovator in energy storage, was an easy one,” says David Bywater, CEO of Vivint Solar. “We believe their energy storage system is going to delight our customers and are impressed with their ambitious plans for the future. We look forward to bringing this innovative solution to consumers, beginning in our California markets, and to empowering greater renewable energy usage.”

source: http://solarindustrymag.com/mercedes-benz-taps-vivint-solar-u-s-rollout-home-batteries

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“According to the “Fair Use” clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

Two-Thirds Of Germany Was Powered By Renewable Energy On Easter Sunday

German Solar Array

Two-Thirds Of Germany Was Powered By Renewable Energy On Easter Sunday

by Tom Hale

On the last weekend of April, as the breeze was blowing and the sunshine was beaming, two-thirds of Germany’s electricity came from renewable energy sources.

On Sunday, April 30, an average of 64 percent of electricity consumed in Germany came from renewable sources, according to data by German think-tank Agora Energiewende. At around 2pm, the share of renewables rose to 85 percent and from 10am to 6pm over 75 percent of demand was covered by clean energy.

Most of this push came from solar power plants, closely followed by a large contribution from wind farms (see graph below). That weekend also saw the least amount of coal the country has burned up “in recent history” and nuclear power plants reduce their output by up to 40 percent.

This situation will “be completely normal” by 2030, according to Dr Patrick Graichen, the director of Agora Energiewende.

Germany Solar

These goals have been made a reality through the government’s policy of Energiewende, one of the most extensive pushes towards low-carbon energy sources in the world.

In recent years, this initiative has seen the country pump €1.5 billion ($1.63 billion) a year into clean energy research. As a result of all this work, they hope to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent below 1990 levels, and slash them by at least 80 percent by 2050. A key part of this program is to totally phase out nuclear power by 2022.

“By 2022, the nuclear energy exit will be completed, so that in 2030 there is no longer a problem,” added Graichen. “In addition, inflexible, old coal power plants have to be looked into. Along with the climate protection and the future EU limit values for nitrogen oxide emissions, this is another German Solar Arrayreason to take them off the grid in the foreseeable future.”

So much energy was produced on April 30, it was accompanied by “negative prices” for several hours at the electricity exchange. This means that people were effectively being paid to consume electricity, in a roundabout way. Although that’s good news for the average Joe, it shows that the issue of energy transition can be a thorny one.

“Events like this highlight that eventually we may need to start curtailing because of market-wide oversupply,” Monne Depraetere, an analyst for Bloomberg New Energy Finance, told Bloomberg. “In the long-run, that may provide a case to build technologies that can manage this oversupply – for example more interconnectors or energy storage.”

Outside of Germany, many other countries are pushing to cut their greenhouse gas emissions and move towards clean energy. Just last month, the United Kingdom experienced its first day since the Industrial Revolution when it didn’t burn coal.

source: http://www.iflscience.com/environment/twothirds-of-germany-was-powered-by-renewable-energy-on-easter-sunday/

“According to the “Fair Use” clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

 

 

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Solar delivers cheapest electricity ‘ever, anywhere, by any technology’

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Solar delivers cheapest electricity ‘ever, anywhere, by any technology’

Chile has just contracted for the cheapest unsubsidized power plant in the world, Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) reports.

In last week’s energy auction, Chile accepted a bid from Spanish developer Solarpack Corp. Tecnologica for 120 megawatts of solar at the stunning price of $29.10 per megawatt-hour (2.91 cents per kilowatt-hour or kwh). This beats the 2.99 cents/kwh bid Dubai received recently for 800 megawatts. For context, the average residential price for electricity in the United States is 12 cents per kilowatt-hour.Solar delivers cheapest electricity

“Solar power delivers cheapest unsubsidised electricity ever, anywhere, by any technology,” BNEF Chair Michael Liebreich said on Twitter after this contract was announced.

Carlos Finat, head of the Chilean Renewable Energies Association (ACERA) told Bloomberg that the auction is “a strong warning sign that the energy business continues on the transition path to renewable power and that companies should adapt quickly to this transition process.” Indeed, in the same auction, the price of coal power was nearly twice as high!

Grid-connected solar power on Chile has quadrupled since 2013. Total installed capacity exceeded 1,000 megawatts this year — the most by far in South America. Another 2,000 megawatts is under construction, and there are over 11,000 megawatts that are “RCA Approved” (i.e. have environmental permits).

Chile is aided by the fact that its Atacama desert is “the region with the highest solar radiation on the planet,” according to the Inter-American Development Bank. So much solar is being built in the high-altitude desert that Northern Chile can’t use it all, and the government is rushing to buildnew transmission lines.

Chile is part of a global trend where solar energy has doubled seven times since 2000. In the U.S. alone, it has grown 100-fold in the past decade thanks to a sharp drop in prices that has brought the cost of solar (with subsidies) to under four cents a kilowatt hour in many places, as I detailed last month.

The future for solar could not be sunnier.

Joe Romm

Dr. Joe Romm is Founding Editor of Climate Progress, “the indispensable blog,” as NY Times columnist Tom Friedman describes it.

“According to the “Fair Use” clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

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