California is embarrassing the rest of the country with the amount of solar energy it’s producing

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California is embarrassing the rest of the country with the amount of solar energy it’s producing

REUTERS/Gerardo Garcia

California is the poster child for solar energy: in 2016, 13% of the state’s power came from solar sources. According to the Solar Energy Industries Association, California is in the lead for the cumulative amount of solar electric capacity installed in 2016.

In fact, the California is generating so much solar energy that it is resorting to paying other states to take the excess electricity in order to prevent overloading power lines. According to the Los Angeles Times, Arizona residents have already saved millions in 2017 thanks to California’s contribution.

The state, which produced little to no solar energy just 15 years ago, has made strides — it single-handedly has nearly half of the country’s solar electricity california solargenerating capacity. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, California reached a milestone: for a few hours, more than half the state’s power needs were sourced from solar energy. This put wholesale energy prices in the negative.

When there’s too much solar energy, there is a risk of the electricity grid overloading. This can result in blackouts. In times like this, California offers other states a financial incentive to take their power.

But it’s not as environmentally friendly as one would think. Take Arizona, for example. The state opts to put a pin in its own solar energy sources instead of fossil fuel power, which means greenhouse gas emissions aren’t getting any better due to California’s overproduction.

California’s state goal is to get 50% of all its electricity from renewable sources by 2030.

Mass. Schools To Cut Costs With New Solar Projects

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Mass. Schools To Cut Costs With New Solar Projects

by Joseph Bebon

Solect Energy and Green Street, members of SunPower’s national dealer network, have developed two SunPower solar systems totaling 6.9 MW that will provide electricity to 10 Massachusetts schools.

 

“We applaud Stonehill College for its proven commitment to sustainability,” says Scott Howe, partner and senior vice president of sales at Solect Energy. “With the addition of this SunPower solar canopy system, the college now has a grand total of six megawatts of solar installed on campus – and they are able to reinvest savings earned from the solar systems into areas of need such as student scholarships, maintenance, and campus upkeep.”

In Bridgewater, Green Street has developed a 4.1 MW SunPower Helix Roof system at Ajax United Drive LLC. Green Street will own the off-site solar power system – as well as the associated renewable energy credits – while Attleboro Public Schools will buy the power produced through a PPA, solar projectsaving an estimated $3 million over 20 years, according to SunPower. Energy from the system is expected to meet about 75% of electricity needs for five elementary schools, three middle schools and one high school.

 

“With SunPower’s innovative solar solutions, we were able to transform an unused, off-site rooftop into a mini power plant that benefits a number of partners including the building owner and local school district,” says Scott Kerner, CEO of Green Street. “It’s incredibly rewarding to know that this SunPower solar system will deliver long-term value to the students of Attleboro by generating meaningful savings that can be reinvested into local classrooms.”

 

According to SunPower, a total of about 90 workers contributed to both the Stonehill College and Attleboro Public Schools installations during peak construction. SunPower says its solar technology has helped a number of Massachusetts schools save on energy costs, including Cape Cod Community College, Clark University, Edgerly School, Harvard University, and University of Massachusetts Lowell.

 

source: http://solarindustrymag.com/mass-schools-cut-costs-new-solar-projects

“Solar allows Stonehill to set an example for our students, faculty, and staff by prioritizing sustainability and stewardship of the planet and its resources,” said Michael Shulansky, Associate Director of Communications and Media Relations at Stonehill College.

“Furthermore, our solar installations have helped transform us into a leader in energy efficiency, and provide increased visibility of the College to environmentally conscious students, parents, and communities,” he added.
Financed by SunPower, a global leader in solar innovation, the solar canopies allow Stonehill to experience predictability in energy costs throughout the 20-year lifespan of the system while also reducing the school’s reliance on carbon-based fuels.
“It is wonderful to be a part of Stonehill’s continuous journey in sustainability,” said Scott Howe partner and Senior Vice President of Sales at Solect Energy. “With the addition of this solar canopy, the College now has a grand total of six megawatts of solar installed on campus – and they are able to reinvest savings earned from the solar systems into areas of need such as student scholarships, maintenance, and campus upkeep.”

“According to the “Fair Use” clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

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Two-Thirds Of Germany Was Powered By Renewable Energy On Easter Sunday

German Solar Array

Two-Thirds Of Germany Was Powered By Renewable Energy On Easter Sunday

by Tom Hale

On the last weekend of April, as the breeze was blowing and the sunshine was beaming, two-thirds of Germany’s electricity came from renewable energy sources.

On Sunday, April 30, an average of 64 percent of electricity consumed in Germany came from renewable sources, according to data by German think-tank Agora Energiewende. At around 2pm, the share of renewables rose to 85 percent and from 10am to 6pm over 75 percent of demand was covered by clean energy.

Most of this push came from solar power plants, closely followed by a large contribution from wind farms (see graph below). That weekend also saw the least amount of coal the country has burned up “in recent history” and nuclear power plants reduce their output by up to 40 percent.

This situation will “be completely normal” by 2030, according to Dr Patrick Graichen, the director of Agora Energiewende.

Germany Solar

These goals have been made a reality through the government’s policy of Energiewende, one of the most extensive pushes towards low-carbon energy sources in the world.

In recent years, this initiative has seen the country pump €1.5 billion ($1.63 billion) a year into clean energy research. As a result of all this work, they hope to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent below 1990 levels, and slash them by at least 80 percent by 2050. A key part of this program is to totally phase out nuclear power by 2022.

“By 2022, the nuclear energy exit will be completed, so that in 2030 there is no longer a problem,” added Graichen. “In addition, inflexible, old coal power plants have to be looked into. Along with the climate protection and the future EU limit values for nitrogen oxide emissions, this is another German Solar Arrayreason to take them off the grid in the foreseeable future.”

So much energy was produced on April 30, it was accompanied by “negative prices” for several hours at the electricity exchange. This means that people were effectively being paid to consume electricity, in a roundabout way. Although that’s good news for the average Joe, it shows that the issue of energy transition can be a thorny one.

“Events like this highlight that eventually we may need to start curtailing because of market-wide oversupply,” Monne Depraetere, an analyst for Bloomberg New Energy Finance, told Bloomberg. “In the long-run, that may provide a case to build technologies that can manage this oversupply – for example more interconnectors or energy storage.”

Outside of Germany, many other countries are pushing to cut their greenhouse gas emissions and move towards clean energy. Just last month, the United Kingdom experienced its first day since the Industrial Revolution when it didn’t burn coal.

source: http://www.iflscience.com/environment/twothirds-of-germany-was-powered-by-renewable-energy-on-easter-sunday/

“According to the “Fair Use” clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

 

 

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